TO WHOM DOES YOUR WORK BELONG?

(WEM GEHÖRT DIE ARBEIT?)

2016 – ongoing

An ongoing research project that includes lectures, workshops, and actions. The project investigates how Western democracies aligned with market economies shape the production of art.

“To whom does your work belong? (on censorship and self-censorship)” a workshop held at the University of Arts in Bern focused on the influences that shape art production in Western democracies and compared the influences of opposing political models, such as the Soviet Union. An important point in “To whom does your work belong? (on censorship and self-censorship)” was the idea of the self-regulated citizen – the citizen who is not only disciplined by a state but who complies through self-regulation to established norms and social practices. By using Foucault’s theories on technologies of power and governmentality, this version of “To whom does your work belong?” addressed the question of how far it is possible to translate the idea of the self-regulated citizen into the figure of the artist. How much does the artist self-regulate?

Invited speakers: Sylvia Sasse and Karen van den Berg

“To whom does your work belong?” (on competition) a workshop held at the Village at Sema Biennale Mediacity Seoul started from two premises: first, the market is the main verification system for Western democracies and therefore the main orientation point of the society, and second, every art field is organized in a market-like structure. One of the main characteristics of any market is competition and therefore, this edition was dedicated to exploring the consequences of competition on human behavior and on the production of art.

“To whom does your work belong?” (on fear) a workshop held at the Village at DEPO in Istanbul, organized by the artist Yang Ah Ham concentrated on the topic of “governing through fear”. How does fear influence group dynamics, or how far does fear impede or feed criticality and critical art production? The workshop explored these questions as well as possibilities to collectively overcome fear.

“To whom does your work belong?” is supported by Mondriaan Fonds.